(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"

NORTH CAROLINA 



TOBACCO REPORT 



1954-1955 



Mili 



. u< m 




THE BULLETIN 

of the 

North Carolina Department of Agriculture 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner v 
Number 139 March, 1955 



NORTH CAROLINA 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Glenn G. Gilmore Julian 

HoYLE C. Griffin Monroe 

Claude T. Hall Roxboro 

O. J. Holler Union Mills 

George P. Kittrell Corapeake 

J. Muse McCotter New Bern 

Charles F. Phillips Thomasville 

J. H. Poole West End 

A. B. Slagle Franklin 

J. E. WiNSLOW Greenville 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Compania Anonima Venezelana De Tabaco, 

Caracas, Venezoela, S, A Front Cover 

Tobacco Outlook for 1955 5 

Analysis of Belt Price Variations 9 

State Summary 1954-1955 14 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales 

Report for Season 1954-1955 , 16 

Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales 1954-1955 .... 18 

Producer and Gross Sales of 

Flue-Cured Tobacco By States 1954 18 

Stabilization Receipts by Belts 1954 18 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 1919-1954 19 

North Carolina Burley Crops 1928-1954 20 

North Carolina Tobacco Allotments 1955 21 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and 

Operators by Belts and Markets 1954 24 

Tobacco Consumption (Chart) Back Cover 



FOREWORD 

The sixth annual issue of the Tobacco Report has 
been compiled and prepared by W. P. Hedrick and J. H. 
Cyrus, tobacco specialists with the Division of Markets, 
in cooperation with the U S. Department of Agricul- 
ture under the Research and Marketing Act. 

Credit for statistical data contained herein is due 
the Cooperative Crop Reporting Service of the North 
Carolina and United States Departments of Agricul- 
ture, and the Tobacco Branch of the U.S.D.A. Agricul- 
tural Marketing Service. 

This issue of The Bulletin is dedicated to the ex- 
port leaf dealers, who are responsible for the sale in 
foreign countries of 40 per cent of the flue-cured crop. 
Their efforts have made a great contribution in keep- 
ing North Carolina in the forefront as producer of 
the world's finest tobacco. 




Commissioner of Agriculture 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Section, Markets Division, North 
Carolina Department of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 



1955 Tobacco Outlook 

Flue-cured growers completed a very successful tobacco season 
in 1954. North Carolina's estimated crop of 913 million pounds 
is the second largest on record, having been exceeded only by the 
1951 production of 978 million pounds. 

While the Secretary of Agriculture has announced a five per 
cent cut in acreage for 1955, this could be more than offset by 
improved weather conditions and the introduction of new high- 
yielding varieties. 

During the past season the Flue-Cured Tobacco Cooperative 
Stabilization Corporation received 130,252,165 pounds from all 
belts. Although this was less than had been anticipated, the Sta- 
bilization Corporation ended the season with the largest carry- 
over on record. Stocks held January 31, 1955, included: 

1951 Crop 17,351,750 Pounds 

1952 Crop 56,038,600 Pounds 

1953 Crop 118,939,050 Pounds 

1954 Crop 115,099,150 Pounds 

Total 307,428,550 Pounds 

Flue-cured tobacco holdings by dealers, manufacturers and the 
Stabilization Corporation were 2,553 million pounds on Janu- 
ary 1, 1955. The national carry-over of stock on July 1, 1955, 
is expected to be 1,985 million pounds, approximately the same 
held a year ago. 

Domestic Situation 

The domestic use of flue-cured during 1954 was stimulated by 
the introduction of 19 new brands of cigarettes, or new versions 
of old brands. While this increased the disappearance of tobacco, 
the consumption of cigarettes showed a marked decrease. The 
public consumed 368 billion cigarettes in 1954 against 386 bil- 
lion in 1953, a loss of four per cent in total sales. Factors which 
have been named as contributing to the decrease in consump- 
tion are taxes leading to higher prices on cigarettes, the slight 
economic squeeze, and the controversy over the influence of to- 
bacco on health. 

Manufacturers used about 780 million pounds of flue-cured in 
1954. The main outlet for flue-cured is in cigarettes, production 
of which is expected to stay about the same level in 1955. 



Flue-cured consumed in tobacco for pipes and roll-your-own 
cigarettes continues to decrease. Sales of this type of tobacco 
product dropped four per cent during 1954. Chewing tobacco and 
snuff lost some favor with consumers and the gradual downward 
trend will probably continue. 

Export Situation 

The 1954 export of flue-cured tobacco is estimated at 445 mil- 
lion pounds, which is a slight increase over 1953. The stocks of 
flue-cured in most foreign countries are lower than one year 
ago. A survey of cigarette production in 34 leading countires 
shows that consumption is increasing. The major factor in this 
over-all use has undoubtedly been the general improvement in 
world economic conditions. Cigarettes seem to have become avail- 
able to more people in low-income countries. There has been 
a definite trend away from other tobacco products in favor of 
cigarettes. Countries showing the largest percentage of increase 




Tobacco being picked and re-sorted before going through a re-drying 
machine. A large percentage of tobacco going into the export trade must 
be re-sorted. 



6 




Tobacco being sold under artificial lights on the warehouse floor. Use of 
artificial lighting is still in the experimental state. 



in cigarette consumption are : 

West Germany .... 49 Per Cent Canada 22 Per Cent 

Venezuela 42 Per Cent Netherlands 22 Per Cent 

Japan 40 Per Cent France 15 Per Cent 

Our ability to move a large quantity of flue-cured into these 
countries depends on the economic conditions. At present, the 
gold and dollar holdings abroad have increased. The sales of 
tobacco should be helped by the Agricultural Trade Develop- 
ment and Assistance Act, passed by the last Congress. This 
provides a means whereby agricultural commodities may be 
sold through private trade channels and foreign currencies ac- 
cepted. Therefore the foreign market is wide open, depending 
on our ability to sell. 

Burley Type 31 

Burley tobacco growers are faced with a serious overproduct- 
tion problem. The Secretary of Agriculture announced a 10 per 



cent cut in acreage for 1955. The 1955 marketing quota results 
in a national allotment of 362,000 acres compared with 399,000 
acres allotted in 1954. 

Reductions will not be applied, however, to individual farms 
having a hurley allotment of seven-tenths of an acre or less; 
and 64 per cent of the farms are in this category. This creates 
a very real problem, as it means that 36 per cent of the hurley 
growers will have to absorb the entire 10 per cent cut in acreage. 

In North Carolina we have 19,302 hurley allotments for 11,592 
acres. Eighty per cent of the growers will have allotments of 
one acre or less in 1955. 

If yields per acre are near the average of the past few years, 
the nation's crop in 1955 could be very near the 1954 production 
of 620 million pounds. The total supply of hurley is now about 
1,825 million pounds, or 3^2 years' requirements. 

Burley is practically all used domestically. For the past three 
years domestic use has amounted to 500 million pounds per year, 
with only about 25 million being exported. 

Price Outlook 1955 

Both flue-cured and burley prices will be supported at 90 
per cent of parity during the 1955 season. This is mandatory as 
long as tobacco marketing quotas are in effect. Indications are 
that parity index (prices paid by farmers for commodities, 
interest, taxes, and wages) will remain at about the current 
level and that price supports for flue-cured will be about 47.9 
and for burley 46.4 cents per pound. 

Tobacco Referendums 

Flue-cured growers will vote on the continuation of the acre- 
age allotment and price stabilization program during 1955. 
While the date of the referendum has not been announced, it is 
expected that the Secretary of Agriculture will call for the vote 
during July, 1955. Growers will have the opportunity of voting 
for one-year control, three-year control or no control. 

At the same time growers will be asked to vote on continua- 
tion of Tobacco Associates, whereby growers assess themselves 
10 cents per acre to support this agency. Tobacco Associates 
promotes the sale of flue-cured tobacco in foreign markets all 
over the world. 

8 



Analysis of Belt Price Variations 

Why does one type of flue-cured tobacco consistently average 
a lower price year after year than another type? During recent 
years this question has caused a great deal of concern among 
growers, especially in the Old Belt area, and marketing special- 
ists. There must be a reason, or several reasons for a consistently 
lower general average price for one type of flue-cured tobacco 
compared with other types. The purpose of this analysis of the 
crop and market situation by types is to bring to the surface 
some of the major factors affecting the general average price 
of tobacco sold in the various belts. 

Variations in Grade Average Prices 

The first and most discussed factor is the difference paid for 
the same standard grade of tobacco in the various belts. In mak- 
ing this study three grades, B4F, C4F, and X4F, were selected 
because a large volume of tobacco in each of the belts is usually 
classified into these grades, making them representative grades 
of each belt. These grades also represent the three natural groups 
of flue-cured tobacco, Leaf (B), Cutter (C) and Lug (X) groups. 

The following table shows a comparison of the prices paid 
for the three representative grades of tobacco in the various 
belts over a six-year period. 

Table I 

Prices Paid for B4F, C4F and X4F By Types 
1949-1954 Average 

Type 13 Type 12 Type IIB Type llA 

Grade ((^ per lb.) (^ per lb.) (^ per lb.) (0 per lb.) 

X4F 55.8 57.3 56.8 56.0 

C4F 65.1 67.1 67.6 67.7 

B4F 57.3 58.5 57.0 54.3 

Table I above shows that there is very little variation in the 
prices paid for lug tobacco in the different belts, as illustrated 
by the representative grade of X4F over a six-year period. Thus 
the price paid for the various types of lug tobacco has very little 
effect on the change in market average price from one belt to 
another. 

A comparison of the average prices paid for C4F in the vari- 



ous belts indicate that there has been practically no difference 
in the prices paid for cutter tobacco in any of the belts, except 
type 13 in the Border Belt which averaged around two cents per 
pound less. However, it should be noted that the price paid for 
cutters showed a slight increase from type 13 through type 11 A 
during this period, with the Old Belt showing the highest aver- 
age for cutter tobacco. 

The greatest variation in belt prices is found in leaf tobacco, 
as illustrated by the B4F grade shown in table I. A comparison 
of the prices paid for B4F in the different belts shows that type 
12 had the highest average, and that type 11 A had the lowest 
average, with types 13 and IIB falling between these two ex- 
tremes. The spread in the average price paid for Eastern Belt 
B4F and the same grade in the Old Belt during this six-year 
period was 4.2 cents per pound. 

This brings up the frequently asked question of why is there 
a difference in the average price paid for the same grade of to- 
bacco in the various belts? The only tangible answer to this 
question is the change in type of tobacco from one belt to the 
other. It should be remembered that each standard grade as it 
is applied in each belt has the same general specifications, but 
the thing that makes the same standard grade of tobacco differ- 
ent from one belt to another is the type, which is caused by differ- 
ence in soil, climate and other natural factors. 

Leaf tobacco is the only group in which there is a consistently 
wide spread in the prices paid for the same grade in the differ- 
ent belts. However, the difference in the prices paid for the same 
grades of leaf tobacco in the various belts does not account for 
the entire spread between season average prices obtained from 
belt to belt. 

The accompanying pie charts will explain further the spread 
in belt average prices, such as the Old Belt crop which con- 
sistently averages less than the Eastern Belt crop, even in a year 
like 1952 when type llA and type 12 B4F averaged the same 
price. 

Group Distribution By Type 

Distribution of the crop into various groups according to type 
can be seen in Chart I, which is based on a six-year average. The 
percentage of the crop grading into leaf, cutter and lug grades 
has an influence on the average price paid for the crop in the 

10 



OLD BELT- TYPE I lA 



MIDDLE BELT- TYPE I IB 





EASTERN BELT -TYPE 12 



BORDER BELT -TYPE 13 





CHART I. Percentage of Crop Grading Into the Various Groups by 
Type, 1949-1954 Average. 

different belts. For example, the percentage of leaf tobacco in 
the crop increases from one belt to the other as you go from 
type 13, which has an average of 57.6 7^ leaf tobacco in the crop, 
to type 11 A, which has an average of 65.5 /r leaf tobacco. Since 
the leaf group usually contains a large volume of medium and low 
price tobacco, it will have a deflating effect on the market aver- 
age price in the belts having the largest percentage of leaf 
tobacco. 

Chart I also shows that the highest percentage of cutter to- 
bacco is produced in the type 12 crop, and the percentage of 
cutters decreases from type 12 to type 13 and from type 12 to 
llA. This is one of the factors that causes the Eastern Belt to 
come out with the highest average price most years, since cutter 
tobacco is the highest priced group of any volume. 

The percentage of lugs does not vary enough from one type 
to the other to have much effect on the belt average price. How- 



11 



ever, Chart I does show a slight decrease in the percentage of 
lugs from type 13 to type 11 A. There is practically no differ- 
ence in the percentage of primings (P) and nondescript (N) 
from one belt to the other, except that for type llA it is slightly 
lower. 

Belt Quality Comparison 

Another factor that has an influence on the belt average price 
is the percentage of the crop grading into the top qualities. Table 
II groups the crops of the individual belts into the top four quali- 
ties, and 5th and 6th qualities. 

Table II 

Percentage of Crop Grading Into The Top 

Four Qualities Compared With Fifth and Sixth 

Qualities By Types, 1949-1954 Average 



Qualities 


Type 13 


Type 12 


Type IIB 


Type llA 


(1-4) 


56.0% 


56.2% 


55.1% 


54.7% 


(5 and 6) 


37.0 


36.2 


36.6 


39.5 



This table shows that type 12 tobacco has the largest per- 
centage of the crop going into the top four qualities, and the 
smallest percentage going into the 5th and 6th qualities. This 
factor gives the Eastern Belt another boost in obtaining the 
highest market average. The table also shows that the type 
llA crop has the smallest percentage of the top four qualities, 
and the largest percentage of qualities 5 and 6, which is a factor 
that has a depressing effect on the market average abtained 
in the Old belt. Types 13 and IIB fall between these two ex- 
tremes. 

Color Distribution of Leaf Group by Types 

The color of tobacco produced in the different belts is another 
factor that has a great influence over the general market aver- 
age of tobacco sold in each belt. This is especially true in the leaf 
group, since the price variation between lemon, orange, and red 
color leaf tobacco is greater than in other groups. A comparison 
of lemon, orange, red and all other colors by type in chart II shows 
that type 12 has the largest percentage of lemon leaf, and that 
type 11 A has the smallest percentage of lemon leaf. Type 12 
has the smallest percentage of orange leaf, type 11 A has the 

12 



OLD BELT- TYPE MA 




MIDDLE BELT-TYPE llB 
ORANGE 

•5.1^ 




EASTERN BELT-TYPE 12 



BORDER BELT -TYPE 13 





CHART II. Percentage of Leaf Group Grading Into Lemon, Orange 
and Red, by Types, 1949-1954 Average. 

largest percentage of orange leaf, with types 13 and IIB falling 
between the Eastern and Old Belt in percentage of lemon and 
orange leaf. The percentage of red leaf gradually increases from 
type 13, which has an average of 2.6% red leaf, to type 11 A, 
which shows an average of 9.9% red leaf. 

These color factors greatly influence the market price of leaf 
tobacco since there is a direct relationship between the color 
and thickness of tobacco. Lemon color tobacco has the thinnest 
body, orange color tobaccoo is of a medium body, and red tobac- 
co is usually of a heavy body. Therefore, colors are directly re- 
lated to the cigarette qualities of flue-cured tobacco. Thus an in- 
crease in the percentage of orange and red leaf tobacco in any 
belt will greatly affect the average price paid for tobacco in that 
belt. 

In conclusion, we find that the spread between belt average 
prices is not caused by any one factor, but a combination of 
several factors. Most of these factors are directly related to 
soil, climate and other natural phenomena over which man has 
very little control. 



13 



State Summary 1954-1955 

The 1954 crop of flue-cured tobacco in North Carolina was more equal 
in quality in all belts than it has been in several years. However, the 
Border Belt and isolated areas of other belts felt the effect of an early 
summer drought. 

On October 15, the state was struck by Hurricane "Hazel" which caused 
considerable damage to tobacco in pack houses and on warehouse floors, 
when roofs were blown off and some houses were blown down. 

The 1954 marketing season in North Carolina began in the Border Belt 
on August 2, and final sales were held in the Old Belt on December 21, 1954. 
The marketing season covered a period of 98 sale days compared with 100 
days during the 1953 season. 

The State had 44 flue-cured markets operating during the season. These 
markets sold 879,783,438 pounds of producer's tobacco for a sum of $477,- 
887,048, which gives the growers an average of $54.32 per hundred for the 
1954 season. This is slightly more than the $54.10 per hundred received 
by the growers in 1953, when they received $441,873,772 for the 816,- 
826,170 pounds of flue-cured tobacco sold during that season. Thus, the 
1954 producer sales were increased by 62,957,268 pounds over the previous 
year, and the dollar value increased $36,013,277 over the value of the 1953 
crop. 

Type 13 — The eight markets operating in the North Carolina Border Belt 
opened for the 1954 season on August 2. The general quality of offerings 
was not as good as the previous year, and the average prices for practi- 
cally all grades were lower. Leaf, smoking leaf and nondescript grades 
were off from $3.00 to $9.00; cutters were off from $1.00 to $5.00, lugs 
$1.00 to $4.00, and primings were off about $1.00 per hundred. 

Producer sales for the 1954 season totaled 146,374,552 pounds, which sold 
for the sum of $79,471,644, giving this belt a season average of $54.29 
per hundred. Comparative figures for 1953 show that growers sold 158,- 
571,908 pounds for $91,828,174, averaging $57.91 per hundred. These 
figures represent decreases of $3.62 in average price, $12,356,530 in value, 
and 12,197,356 in pounds sold. The 1954 season ended in North Carolina 
on October 28 after operating for 63 days as compared with 58 in 1953. 

Type 12 — The 17 Eastern Belt markets opened for the 1954 season on 
August 16, which was the earliest opening on record for this belt. However, 
selling time during opening week was reduced to 60 per cent of normal. The 
quality of the crop was below that of the previous season, and the prices 
paid for the majority of grades were lower than in 1953. Decreases in 
grade averages ranged from $1.00 to $8.00 with the greatest losses occur- 
ring in the lower quality grades. 

Producer sales for the season amounted to 471,361,756 pounds, selling 
for $260,571,852, giving the Eastern Belt a season average of $55.28 per 
hundred. This is $2.44 below the 1953 record average of $57.73 per hundred. 
The volume of producer sales in 1953 was only 432,383,188 pounds, with a 
dollar value of $249,649,514. The Eastern Belt completed its 1954 season 
on December 8 for a season of 79 sale days compared with 63 in 1953. 

14 



Type IIB — The middle Belt held its first sales of the 1954 season on 
August 23, when the five "Sandhill" markets opened. The other five middle 
belt markets opened the following day, August 24. However, all markets 
in this belt svispended sales on August 25, because of a lack of buyers, and 
sales were resumed on August 31. The sales on all markets wei'e limited 
to 50 per cent of the normal selling time, or 1,100 baskets per set of buyers, 
for the first two weeks. 

Growers in this belt sold their 1954 crop for around 17.4 million dol- 
lars more than they received for their 1953 crop. This was due to a 
substantial increase in volume and an improvement in quality. Decreases 
in grade averages ranging from $1.00 to $7.00 occurred in about two-thirds 
of the grades, while a majority of the poor and low quality leaf grades 
showed an increase from $1.00 to $3.50 per hundred. 

Season producer sales reached a total of 142,537,604 pounds, returning 
the growers $75,351,240, givirg them a season average of $52.86. In 1953 
producers sold 122,732,884 lbs. for $57,906,330 averaging only $47.18 per 
hundred. The middle belt operated over a period of 73 sale days, ending 
on December 10, 1954. In 1953 the season covered 68 sale days. 

Type 11 A — The nine North Carolina old belt markets opened for the 1954 
season on September 13. The 1954 crop of old belt tobacco was of a much 
higher quality than in 1953, and the average price for a majority of the 
grades moved up from the 1953 level. Advances in grade prices ranged 
from $1.00 to $8.00. However, a few of the better quality grades showed 
decreases ranging from $1.00 to $3.00 per hundred. The 1954 crop con- 
sisted of a larger percentage of cutter and smoking leaf than in the pre- 
vious year, with more lemon and orange color grades. 

North Carolina growers received $62,492,313 for 119,509,526 pounds 
of tobacco, which gave them a season average of $52.29 per hundred. This 
was the third highest average on record, being surpassed only by the 1950 
and 1919 crop averages. In 1953 growers sold only 103,138,190 pounds for 
$42,488,754, averaging only $41.20 per hundred. Final sales were held in 
North Carolina on December 21, for a season of 69 sale days. The 1953 
season ended on January 18, 1954. 

Type 31 — North Carolina Burley markets opened for the 1954-1955 season 
on November 30. However, no sales were held at Boone until December 1, 
because sales on this market alternate with Mountain City, Tennessee, on 
Tuesday and Thursday. The quality of the 1954 crop compared very favor- 
ably with the high quality of the 1953 crop. Average prices paid for most 
grades were down from $1.00 to $4.00 per hundred compared with the 
previous year. About 70 per cent of the crop was sold before Christmas. 

North Carolina producer sales set a new record of 20,410,567 pounds 
for a record market value of $10,624,067, giving North Carolina growers 
a season average of $52.05 per hundred. This is $1.66 below the previous 
year's average of $53.71 when growers received $7,881,050 for 14,674,398 
pounds of tobacco. Final sales were held at Asheville and West Jefferson 
on January 14, 1955, and Boone closed out the North Carolina season on 
January 19, 1955, after operating for 28 sale days. The 1953-54 season 
operated over a period of 27 sale days. ' 

15 



m 

ON 

m 
o 

c 
o 

o 
o 



o 

Q. 

o 

CI 

M 

3 
O 

Q 

;k 

O 

o 
u 
u 

o 

o 
H 

o 
c 



o 
U 



lO ^ '^ 
O t-; Oi 

t>-^odt-05CDo6od 



oooT-icviLQ«D-r)<a5 

C~ -^_^ C~ O^ i-H_ Tt< CJ3^ 00^ 

00 1-H CO CO 00 i-T i-T t-^ 

tD-^(MC<lt-CC>C0C5 
tH^ to t-;_ CO_^ C<)_ 00_^ O^ r-^ 



lO 



■^ 



^^cdt-hooo^oo 

^tHCOMt-HC^ILOCO 

ooai^LOOOinco-^ 
c^^c^tcoi— iooc--~i-ro5 

(M i-H_ CD LO^ CO CO_ O OJ^ 

ooooioot-^ooooo 



Oh 


















>H 


















H 


















P 


M< 


1X1 


^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


00 


CO 


T-H 


Tf 


1^ 


m 


"* 


r- 


CO 


H 


r^ 


CO 


'^ 


CM 


o 


CD 


00 


CD 




















Ph 


r^ 


OJ 


r- 


T— ( 


o^ 


CO 


00 


l^ 


P 


(M 


!£> 


1-1 


CD 


^ 


CM 


1—1 


c:i 


o 


(M 


CO 


O 


Of) 


CO 


iH 


o^ 


o 


■1— 1 


T-l 




t- 




Tt 


1-1 


T}< 


w 


















P 


















hJ 


















^ 




















to 


Oi 


r^ 


Oi 


1-1 


lO 


OS 


CD 


pi. 


CO 


tr- 


^ 


Oi 


CO 


c- 


1-1 


CM 


1 n 


lO 


ee 


lO 


■^ 


1—1 


CM 


^ 


m 


w 


in 


la 


lO 


U5 


iii 


lO 


in 


m 


n 


















tf 


















w 


o 


00 


(M 


00 


CO 


'^ 


^ 


o 


Q 


00 


OJ 


Oi 


^ 


OJ 


1^ 


00 


o 


T— 1 


lO 


o 


CD 


C5 


00 


-^ 


00 


p^ 


















o 


o 


CO 


o 


00 


CO 


CM 


1-1 


o 


o 


T-H 


lO 


CO 


o 


in 


O 


1-1 


P3 


CM 


Oi 


o 


lO 


lO 


CO 


OS 


Oi 



i>coincocD-*ooco 



^coco-^cm?otj<co 



5 « ^ c 



:i 



O O 



5tl 


o 


-(J 


o 

<1> 






O 




y 


OJ 


XI 


n 


-M 


H 




?H 


>i 


r^ 


^ 


■p 




K 


CS 


OS 


P 


a 


^ 




fa 


fa 


fa 


1-4 


H 





CM-^ooosoooiCDOincooo 
1-; Tt 00 00 oi CM ^ in t-; Ti< ^ 

!>■>*■<*■ o6inCTJc-^o6-^-*'o5t-o'aio5t> 
ininininininininininininco-r}<mm 



Tj<CM00^i-l'*00CD00OCDCMC0CDOCD 

Ciin-^ooincot~ooc-co-*ci-rt<aiinm 

i-l'TfCMCDCOCDOOiinCMCO-^OCOCOt- 



cooocMCMi-icD-^i-i-^coaicMaic^-^T-i 
ooicococoaiast-^oocscoininiH 
o^coocMCMCMcoinininoot-incoin 



inocM-^oocDaicoin-^t>i-i-^in cm co 
CD -^^ -^ CO in c-_ CM oo_ I-; o in CO CM in 00 CO 
cm' CO ^ in ^' co' CO in CO in "^ ^' in CO in in 
ininininmininininininininininin 



W 

Oh 
>^ 

H 
Q 

Pi 

W 
fa 

W 
CQ 

as 
w 

cc 
<^ 
fa 



CMOCD^C-COO^ 
C0t-CMOC0C-CMC~ 

co_ CO oo_^ -^^^ i-H_ t-_^ t~ in_^ 
co" oT oT i-T co"~ oo" co" cm'~ 

OOOCMOOOOOCMCO 

00 ^__ in co__ o CD oo__ cft 
CO i-H o" OO" CD 00 oo" cm'~ 

1— liHi— ICMiHCDt-i— I 



00 CD CD CO t- CD 00 

CD -^ in CO in CO CD 

-^__ CO CD_^ 05_ 00 CD CM 

00 CD 00 o i-T Ti<~ c? 

in CM -^ CM '^ t- ^ 

CO CD 00__ T}<_ C0__ iM 00 

CO CO in CO co" CD 



CO 



05 



ooocMoO'*oooocMOoooi-<coin'* 
a5CM05CMcDincM'*int~t~t~t-ii-io 
in i-j^ 1^ oo_^ oo_^ oo_^ CM_^ in o oi^ 00 o in 1-1 t-^ 

i-T cm" cm" CO in c-^ o^ oT cd rn^ ■^" co cd cd" i-T 

'*CM00C~OCDC0O'^C0a5^i-lrt<i-l 
CO CO CO CM^ CM^ 00__ 00_^ 1-H 00_^ CM^ Oi 05^ 1-j^ C0_^ 00 

1-h" i-T i-H*" cm" cm" m" oo" th" co" co th" i-T cm" 



i-icocDcocMaicocMincDt~oiin^iHCD 
CMt-;coooqr)<a>^_oqcocMCM_t>OTHoq 
CO CO T^' CD ■^' ■^' CO CD CO in in in" in •^' CD in 
inininininininininininininininm 



-^ O ^ CO CO 00 CM 

CO in CO t- c~ 1— I Oi 

O CM^ CD in CM_^ Oi -r)<_^ 

in t-^ t-^ t-" o o co" 



CM O O CO 



CO ^ CD in 

CM CM CM CM 

00 O "^ CD 



m CO CM CM in 

00 CM '^ CO 00 

in ^ t-^ OJ^ OS 

in ■^" in cm" t^ 

O O Oi CO 00 

05^ co__ oj^ CO CO 

Tt" ^f o cm" 00 

1-1 T-l 1-1 1-1 00 



'^cocMC~in'^'*TtTft-cDTj<'*ooino5 



Q) o ttl 



? 2 -C C <? 



43 C 






0) ;:; ^ CJ 



.+^ -p r^ 






C3 o 



'13 cS rt 0) r3 



"^ C TO K^ ►-» K^ 



^^ 



(MOilOC-OOiOCTiO-^CO 



Ot-t-^T-li-lt-(M10tD 

o in oj o c<] oq -^^ CD lo CO 
oot-hc-^-^iocxJi-Ioo i-J CO 



ocMooasrH'^fajcDC-ai 

(M^ O (» -^^^ rH CO CO 00 O t^ 

lOOoTooc^iio^io-t^c-ci 

OlOi-ICXJOO^-^OfMCO 

-^_^ in io_ 1-^ in -^_ i-H c- ^ ^ 

in CO i-T CO*" ■^'~ of in oT to" 00 



CO 



CO 



(MixicvioocoT-ic--^in 

rH^ CO 0_ ,-( Oi^ C5_ CD C~ «0_ 

'*" crT ^"" oo" t-" o T-T co" 00 

CDOOOO'^OOt-'^OOO 

(M__ in t-^ CO o^ in M -^ CO 

co" in c-^ c^f oo' o t> in 00 



CO CO 

(M CO 

C3 CO 

00 c<i 



cocoTHujinoiT—ic^iin 
ina5C5t~^o-^_coi-i 
ocico't-^'^oococo' 
in-^inTtinininLnin 



00 in 
o CO 




^ 
(M 


05 

CO 


CO 00 


00 


,-H 


CO 



^ H 

Oh 

? Q 

■ 

W 

;^ 
>^ 

fa 



T}<T:t*-*OC^(N0000^^ 

ooainos'^coi-icococ^ 

W^ ^_^ O^ C-;^ CD t-;^ 00_^ C- (M_^ t-h^ 

■^^ -^^ CO oT o o ^"^ i-T in oo" 
oost-hoooooococooc- 
cocot-^t-^i-Hincoco t-;^co^ 
in ■^'~ o c^f in T-T 00 co~ c--^ o' 
■^ CO c<i (^a i-H 



COCOOfMCOtMM-^OOO 

inooinoooojinoooioo 
T-H-^inco^ascocooaoo 

CO CD t> o T-T co" in ^"^ in~ '# 

t~t-CD(MC5COCOOCOOi 
C0t:-t-C0(MO00(M05T-i 



■^ (M 



(M 



CDCOCD<Mt-O5"^CqcO00 

cgrpco'^int-cooqaiT-H 

'^ <m' '^ in co' o o c<i CO t-^ 
■^inin-^inininLnin-^ 



oooo^oocooy^^eo^ 
•^coooco-^coinco-^ 
o^Oi^ini— I t- ■>* '"I'^^'-^o 

1— ic^inaTocT-^oic^o-^ 

COtHtJ<CO00-^COt— IC^OO 
Ol^ CO OJ^ '^^ 00 in t-^ "^^ t-;, '"1, 

■^^ CO in c^" o ctT t- i-h" CO o^r 



CO 



CO 



(M 



CDOO^OO'^^^COO 

T-H^CD-r-lt-O^OO^ 

o 05_ 00 CO ^__ 00^ CO in t-^ 
t-h" -rf oo' in co" in cT -^'~ CO 
omcoc-cDTHi-HTto 

t-;^ O O rH '^^ C^ ^^ 00^ "^^ 

<ri of oT of CO co" o oo" co" CO 

rH ^ r-l CD 



ocococo^oocoooco 

COCOOCi^^OOC^tH 
r-H^OO^C^a3<^^OCOCO 

c^f co" CD CO -^ co" in" (>i in 

(MCOC-t-OOOCOC-t- 

OOOO CO ^^05 o^ 00_^ 
r-T rn" i-T rH~ Cd" 



CDMOOC^IOOOOOOO-^ 

ini— iinc<icoininoc<i 
Q0_^ 7-^ co_^ co_^ in -rH M^ oa^ ^_^ 

oo" 00 oi i-T i-H (m" "^^ c^" oo" 

t~oocoococooot~c<i 

CD Oi_ i-H oo__ oo_^ oi CO T-H in 

00 t- oo" oa" i-T oi" t-^ co" CD 

1-1 in 



Q 
W 

oi 

D 

U 

l-H 
< 

X 
o 



l-H !M Tl< 

in CD in 

cD_^ co__ in 

t-h" r-T t-^ 



eoco^cooooocoococD 



Tl<C<lTl<CO00CD^CD<M rH 

i-i in 



ns 



5? 1h 






tc 






en ':< O 



? C 



^ 03 3 r:; 3 



OJ 






P ■ P 

........ ^ O 

c- o ■ ■ ■ IS ^-^ i 

^ ^ 1 1 ^- -s § I I ^" 



5tl 



< m ^ 



I—] CO 

^■3 



Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales 

1954-1955 

Average 
Belt Pounds Price Dollars 



I 2,976,506 
7,491,590 

6,206,547 
18,673,896 

2,796,399 
5,854,575 

2,416,457 
4,511.451 

453,372 
951,100 



Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured By 
Sfafes-1954 

PRODUCER SALES GROSS SALES 

State Pounds Average Price Pounds Average Price 



Border Belt 






Dealer 


7,312,029 


40.71 


Wai-ehouse 


13,945,986 


53.72 


Eastern Belt 






Dealer 


15.135,118 


41.01 


Wai-ehouse 


35,419,028 


52.72 


Middle Belt 






Dealer 


6,668,196 


41.94 


Warehouse 


11,397,020 


51.37 


Old Belt 






Dealer 


5,563,900 


43.43 


Warehouse 


8,743,670 


51.60 


Burley Belt 






Dealer 


1,017,280 


44.57 


Warehouse 


2,046,940 


46.46 



N. C 879,783,438 54.32 983,968,385 53.74 

Va 143.275,242 52.33 154,354,556 52.05 

S. C 123,687,402 48.74 140,978,874 48.36 

Ga , 139,925.534 45.65 159,453,769 45.32 

Fla 22,750,605 54.54 26,813,027 54.25 

TOTAL 1,309,422,221 52.65 1,465.568.611 52.14 



Stabilization Receipts by Belts 1954 



Belt Type 

Old Belt IIA 

Middle Belt IIB 

Eastern Belt 12 

Border Belt 13 

Ga.-Fla. Belt 14 



TOTAL 11-14 



Producer Sales 


Stabilization 


Percentage 


(Pounds) 


Receipts (lbs.) 


Stab. 


Received 


262,784,768 


40,772,930 




15.5 


" 142,537,604 


15,833,654 




11.1 


471,361,756 


38.761,906 




8.2 


270,061,954 


26,609,050 




9.9 


162,676,139 


8,274,625 




5.1 


1,309,422,221 


130,252,165 


10.0 



18 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crop 1919-1954 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1919 


521,500 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925. 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


, 624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,685 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,341 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,331 


913,010 


493,000=-=* 


54.00='==:= 



Source: N. C. and U.S.D.A. Crop Reporting Service. 
Estimate of Division of Markets based on producers' sales. 



19 



Norfh Carolina Burley Crops 1928-1954 







Yield Per 












Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 


Year 


No. Acres 


(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1928 


3,600 


650 


2,340 


$ 690 


$29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


809 


17.50 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


11,900 


1,900 


22,610 


11,750** 


52.00** 



* Source: N. C. and U.S.D.A. Crop Reporting Service. 
** Estimate of Division of Markets based on producers' sales. 

20 



Nort-h Carolina Tobacco Allofmenfs 1955* 
Flue-Cured 



County 

Alamance . 
Alexander 

Anson 

Beaufort . . , 

Bertie 

Bladen . . . . 
Brunswick 
Cabarrus . 
Caldwell . . 
Camden . . . . 
Carteret . . . 
Caswell ... 
Catawba . . . 
Chatham 
Chowan . . . , 
Cleveland . . 
Columbus . 
Craven ... 
Cumberland 

Dare 

Davidson . 

Davie 

Duplin . . . . 
Durham . . 
Edgecombe 
Forsyth . . , 
Franklin . . 
Gaston . . . . 

Gates 

Granville 
Greene ... 
Guilford . . 
Halifax ... 
Harnett ... 
Hertford . . , 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Johnston . . 



No. Farms 


Acres 


Rar 


1428 


6,690.9 


35 


988 


2,049.2 


49 


277 


559.6 


60 


2696 


13,442.4 


21 


1918 


8,002.3 


31 


3715 


10,457.8 


28 


1914 


4,627.4 


42 


1 


0.1 


71 


272 


674.9 


58 


2 


6.6 


66 


437 


1,898.9 


50 


1953 


12,894.5 


23 


4 


7.5 


64 


1155 


4,191.4 


45 


204 


768.8 


57 


2 


1.3 


68 


5692 


23,082.5 


7 


1907 


11,955.6 


24 


2594 


7,379.0 


33 


1 


0.1 


72 


1737 


4,682.5 


40 


877 


1,737.5 


52 


5112 


21,720.9 


8 


1071 


5,490.2 


38 


1641 


16,111.2 


16 


2182 


7,060.1 


34 


2957 


16,062.9 


17 


4 


6.6 


65 


136 


379.3 


61 


2153 


18,687.3 


13 


1239 


16,872.7 


15 


3193 


13,011.8 


22 


2383 


8,271.2 


30 


4028 


20,398.4 


10 


1084 


4,548.8 


44 


1061 


4,020.3 


46 


1 


0.9 


70 


819 


1,754.8 


51 


6128 


31,733.7 


2 



21 



Nort-h Carolina Tobacco Allof-ments-1954'^ Cont. 

County No. Farms Acres Rank 

Jones 962 7,602.6 32 

Lee 1372 5,757.4 37 

Lenoir 1973 19,581.2 12 

Martin 1705 11,891.1 25 

Mecklenburg 2 1.1 69 

Montgomery 442 1,360.7 55 

Moore 1622 6,467.5 36 

Nash 3095 25,491.9 5 

New Hanover 99 297.8 62 

Northampton 222 668.8 59 

Onslow 1951 8,782.7 28 

Orange 931 4,664.8 41 

Pamlico 455 1,532.8 54 

Pender 1832 4,558.7 43 

Person 1811 13,507.3 20 

Pitt 2760 35,530.8 1 

Randolph " 1617 4,705.2 39 

Richmond 1110 2,932.2 47 

Robeson 5248 ' 29,046.7 3 

Rockingham 3074 18,308.8 14 

Rowan 48 70.2 63 

Sampson 6006 21,371.4 9 

Scotland 532 1,621.2 53 

Stokes 2812 16,052.6 18 

Surry 3245 15,337.8 19 

Tyrell . 1 1.4 67 

Vance 1530 11,325.3 26 

Wake 4174 27,343.9 4 

Warren 2082 8,657.6 29 

Washington 293 1,342.6 56 

Wayne 3171 20,378.7 11 

Wilkes 1004 2,182.3 48 

Wilson 2238 23,557.2 6 

Yadkin 2757 11,313.8 27 

TOTALS 127,139 664,488.0-* 1-72 



22 



Burley Tobacco Allotments — 1955 



County No. Farms Acres Rank 

Alexander 2 0.8 29 

Alleghany 494 238.6 9 

Ashe 2483 1,221.2 5 

Avery 253 123.8 11 

Brunswick 1 0.1 33 

Buncombe 3315 1,892.9 2 

Burke 9 4.1 22 

Caldwell 28 10.9 20 

Catawba 5 1.6 26 

Cherokee 161 66.7 15 

Clay 185 85.4 12 

Cleveland 9 3.0 23 

Davidson 4 2.3 24 

Gaston 2 0.8 29 

Graham 791 374.5 8 

Haywood 2232 1,320.2 3 

Henderson 128 51.5 16 

Iredell 3 1.4 27 

Jackson 318 128.5 10 

Lincoln 1 0.3 32 

McDowell . 86 30.2 19 

Macon 218 67.9 14 

Madison 3310 3,036.5 1 

Mecklenburg . 1 0.7 30 

Mitchell 1039 575.4 7 

Polk .7 2.0 25 

Randolph 1 0.7 30 

Rutherford 74 33.9 18 

Stokes 2 0.3 31 

Surry 9 1.1 28 

Swain 214 70.8 13 

Transylvania 66 37.2 17 

Watauga 1671 895.5 6 

Wilkes 19 4.5 21 

Yadkin 1 0.1 33 

Yancey 2160 1,305.8 4 

TOTAL 19,302** 11,591.2** 1-33 

* Source: U. S. Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service. 
**New growers for 1955 not included. 

23 



Norf-h Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and 
Operators by Belts and Markef-s-1954 

N. C. BORDER BELT 

Chadbourn (one set buyers) 

Carters No. 1 & 2— J. F. Bullard, L. L. & J. C. Tilley 
Meyers — J. H. Harper, J. D. Hendley 
New Brick — W. C. Coates, Jr., M. E. & R. R. Fag 
New Farmers — Charlie Teachey, J. C. Green 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

Bright Leaf — J. H. Bryant, B. F. Rivenbark 
New Bladen— E. C. Huff, W. McDuffie, N. Cox 
Clarkton Whse. — J. J. Webster, G. D. Rakestraw 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell— A. H. Powell & Sons 

Planters— N. N. Love, H. G. McNeill 

Littleton's No. 1 & 2—0. P. Littleton, P. P. Renfrow 

Fairmont (four sets buyers) 

Big 5 — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Robeson County — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Peoples — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Mitchell-Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Frye No. 1 & 2— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday 

Holliday— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday 

Planters No 1 & 2— G. R. Royster 

Square Deal 1-2-3— W. G. Bassett 

Star-Carolina 1-2-3— C. A. Blankenship, W. G. Sheets, W. M. Puckett 

Twin State 1-2-3— P. R. Floyd, Jr., Paul Wilson 

Liberty — F. P. Joyce, Joe Pell 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers 1 & 2— R. H. Barbour, P. L. Campbell 
Planters — J. W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Lumberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — M. A. Roycroft, J. L. Townsend, J. Johnson 

Smith-Dixie — N. A. McKeithan, E. K. Biggs 

Hedgepeth — R. A. Hedgepeth, J. K. Roycroft, R. L. Rollins 

Liberty — R. E. Wilkens, R. H. Livermore 

Star, Inc. — Hogan Teater, D. T. Stephenson 

Lumberton Cooperative — C. E. McLaurin, Mgr. 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

Carolina — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
New Farmers — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

24 



f 



Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Big- Dixie — Jimmy IMorgan, Clyde Roberts, L. Barefoot 

Brooks— Blair & H. L. Motley 

Crutchfield— G. E. & R. W. Crutchfiekl 

Lea's No. 1 & 2 — Wm. Townes Lea 

Moores— A. H. Moore 

Nelson's No. 1 & 2— John H. Nelson, M. O. Nelson 

Perkins-Newman — H. L. & J. W. Perkins, N. C. Newman 

Planters No. 1 & 2— A. King, Jr., J. W. Peay 

Farmers — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

Columbus County — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie (one set buyers) 

Basnight No. 1-2-3— L. L. Wilkens, H. G. Veazey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2— W. D. Odom, E. R. Evans 

Clinton (one set buyers) 

Carolina— Mrs. Z. D. MeWhorter, L. D. Herring, N. L. Daughtry 

Ross No. 2 — Guy R. Ross 

Farmers— H. A. Carr, J. A. Chesnut, E. L. Dudley, J. J. Hill 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Big 4 Warehouse — E. L. Dudley, T. B. Smothers, Jack Calhoun 
Planters — A. B. Currin 

Farmville (two sets buyers) 

Bell's— L. R. Bell & Sons, C. C. Ivey 

Farmers — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 

Fountains — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 

Monks No. 1 & 2— J. Y. Monk, R. D. Rouse, J. C. Carlton, G. Webb 

Planters — M. J. Moye, Chester Worthington 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina — S. G. Best, Bruce Smith 

Farmers No. 1 & 2— S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Tin— O. L. Littleton, H. C. Whitley 

Victory — J. Hopewell, Bruce Smith 

Big Brick — J. R. Musgrave ' ■ 

Greenville (five sets buyers) 

Dixie— W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dail 

Farmers — J. A. Tripp 

Harris-Rogers — R. E. Rogers, R. E. Harris 

Keel's Cooperative — J. T. Keel, Mgr. 

McGowan's No. 1 & 2— C. H. McGowan 

Morton's— W. Z. Morton 

New Carolina No. 1 & 2 — Floyd McGowan 

New Independent — G. B. Jones 

New Enterprise — L. W. Edwards, Mgr. 

Smith & Suggs— B. B. Suggs, G. V. Smith 

Raynor & Harris — N. G. Raynor, C. C. Harris 



25 



Kinston (four full sets buyers — fifth set incomplete) 
Brooks— J. R. & J. H. Brooks 
Central— J. E. Jones, C. W. Wooten 
Eagle Warehouse Co. — W. H. Jones, J. T. Pratt 
New Carolina — W. H. Jones, J. T. Pratt 
Farmers — J. T. Jenkins 
Kinston Cooperative — D. W. Hodges, Mgr. 
Knott Warehouse, Inc. — K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 
Knotts New— H. G. Knott, W. E. Brewer 
New Dixie — John Jenkins, Mgr. 
Planters — L. 0. Stokes, Mgr. 
Sheppard No. 1 & 2— R. E. Sheppard 
Tapps — Bill King, Mgr. 
The Star Warehouse — C. J. Herring 

Robersonville (one set buyers) 

Adkins & Bailey— I. M. Little, R. K. Adkins 

New Red Front— J. H. Gray, J. W. Peay 

Planters No. 1 & 2— H. T. Highsmith, E. G. Anderson 

Rocky Mount (four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Foxhall No. 1 & 2— W. E. Cobb, H. P. Foxhall 

Mangum — Roy M. Phipps 

Planters No. 1-2-3— S. S. Edmondson, Sec. 

Smith No. 1 & 2— James D. Smith 

Works Warehouse — R. J. Works & Son 

Easley Warehouse Co., Inc. — H. A. Easley, Mgr. 

Farmers Warehouse, Inc. — J. Holt Evans, Mgr. 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Smithfield (two sets buyers) 

Big Planters — J. B. Wooten, Walter Carter 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — N. L. Daughtry, G. G. Adams, W. L. Kennedy 

Gold Leaf No. 1 & 2— R. A. Pearce 

Perkins Riverside — N. L. Perkins 

Wallace No. 1 & 2 — Lawrence and Dixon Wallace 

Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clarks No. 1 & 2— H. I. Johnson, S. A. McConkey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. L. House, J. P. Bunn 
Victory No. 1 & 2— Cliff Weeks, W. L. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior — O. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farrior 
Hussey No. 1 & 3— W. L. Hussey, G. D. Bennett 
Bryant — J. H. Bryant 

Washington (one set buyers) 

Gravely's — H. C. Gravely, W. A. Gravely 
Sermons No. 1 & 2 — W. J. Sermons, J. E. Roberson 

Hassell-Knott-Edwards 1 & 2— L. E. Knott, M. M. Hassell, W. S. 
Edwards 

26 



Wendell (two sets buyers) 

Banners No. 1 & 2 — Walter Walker 

Farmers — L. R. Clark & Son 

Northside — G. Dean, J. H. Sanders 

Planters — G. Dean, J. H. Sanders 

Liberty— H. F. Harris, I. D. Medlin, J. W. Dale 

Star A & B— C. A. Walker 

Central— R. L. Smith, P. D. Bridge, T. R. Barrow 

Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Big Dixie— E. B. Hicks, R. P. Dew, W. C. Thompson 

Wainwright — G. L. Wainwright 

Center Brick No. 1-2-3— Cozart & Eagles Co. 

Farmers — J. J. Gibbons, S. G. Deans 

Growers Cooperative — S. E. Griffin, Mgr. 

New Planters No. 1 & 2— R. T. & W. C. Smith, B. W. Carr 

Smith Warehouse, Inc. A, B & C— H. H. Harris, Jr., Mgr. 

Watson — U. H. Cozart, Jr., Pres. 

Clark's— C. R. & Boyd Clark 

New Liberty— Carl B. Renfro 

Williamston (one set buyers) 

Carolina— S. C. Grifl[in, H. L. Barnhill, J. B. Taylor, E. Lilley 
Farmer— S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnhill, J. B. Taylor, E. Lilley 
Planters — J. W. Gurkin, J. R. Rogers, Carlyle Langley 
Roanoke-Dixie — J. W. Gurkin, J. R. Rogers, Carlyle Langley 
New Deal— J. M. & T. G. Smothers 

Windsor (one set buyers) 

Farmers— S. F. & J. F. Hicks 
Rogers — H. R. Rogers, Mgr. 

MIDDLE BELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen — Hugh T. Hardee 

Planters — Bill Maurer, Gene Maynard 

Growers Whse. — Gene Maynard, Bill Maurer, Robert & Ernest Wright 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

McConnells— W. M. & G. D. Carter, Jr. 
Smothers — R. D. Smothers, Jack Neal 
Victory — R. L. Comer, Jimmy Morgan 

Durham (three sets buyers) 

Liberty — John & Walker Stone 

Roycroft— H. T., M. A. & J. K. Roycroft, J. C. Currin 

Star-Brick — A. L. Carver, Cozart, Currin 

Fai-mers — J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

Planters — J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

Ellerbe (One set buyers) 

Farmers — Geo. Mabe, L. G. Dewitt 

Richmond County — W. H. & H. P. Rummage, W. F. Meadows 

27 



Fuquay-Varina (two sets buyers) 
Big Top — King Roberts 
New Deal— W. M., A. R., A. L. Talley 
Talley Bros.— W. M., A. R., A. L. Talley 
Southside — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 
Varina-Brick — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 
Gold Leaf— P. L. Campbell, R. H. Barbour, S. T. Proctor 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Banners— C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 

Carolina— W. B. Daniel, F. S. Royster 

Planters— W. B. Daniel, F. S. Royster 

Moore's Big Henderson — A. H. Moore 

Farmers — W. J. Alston 

High Price— C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 

Liberty — George T. Robertson 

Alston — W. J. Alston, Jr. 

Ellington— F. H. Ellington & Sons 

Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin— A. N. Wilson, S. T. & H. B. Cottrell 
Southside A & B— Charlie Ford 
Union — G. C. Harris, N. F. Freeman 

Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner— W. L. Mitchell, Jr., Mgr. 

Farmers — B. T. Williams, Julian Adcock, S. B. Knott, Joe Cutts 

Mangum — B. T. Williams, Julian Adcock, S. B. Knott, Joe Cutts 

Fleming No. 1 & 2— G. B. Watkins, D. T. Currin, H. G. Taylor 

Planters— C. R. Watkins 

Johnson — C. R. Watkins 

Owens No. 1 & 2 — J. S. Watkins, L. Gregory 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Big Sanford— Joe M. Wilkins, G. T. Hancock 
Wood 3-W No. 1 & 2— W. F. Wood, C. W. Puckett 
Central No. 1 & 2— D. T. Hobgood, L. B. Maddox 
Wilkins— Joe M. Wilkins 

Warrenton (one set buyers) 
Boyd's— W. P. Burwell 
Center No. 1 & 2— M. D. Carroll 
Currin's No. 1 & 2— D. G. Currin, C. W. Currin 
Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 
Thompson — C. E. Thompson 

OLD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) 

Carolina— R. D. Tickle, J. G. McCray, B. G. Conner 
Coble — N. C. Newman, L. 0. Winstead, R. W. Rainey 
Farmers— O. H. King, C. R. McCauley 

28 



Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro Tobacco Warehouse Co. — R. C. Coleman, Mgr. 

Guilford County Warehouse Co.— J. R. Pell, H. P. Smothers, G. G. Reid 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster, R. G. Angell 
Carolina— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster, R. G. Angell 
Sharp & Smith— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 
Farmers— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

New Farmers — W. C. Coates, W. E. Allen 
Piedmont— J. B. Keck, H. H. Chandler, C. J. Gates 
Planters— W. C. Coates, W. E. Allen 

Mt. Airy (one set buyers) 

New Dixie 1 & 2 — Oscar L. Badgett 

Liberty — R. C. Simmons, Jr., F. V. Dearmin, Dave Smith 

Planters & Jones — Tom and Frank Jones, Buck White 

Reidsville (one set buyers) 

Browns— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Farmers— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Leader — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Watts — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Smothers— T. B. & J. M. Smothers 

Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, R. L. Hester 

Hyco — W. R. Jones, F. J. Hester, Geo. Walker 

Foacre— H. W. Winstead, Jr., J. H. Merritt, D. L. Whitfield 

Planters No. 1 & 2— T. 0. Pass 

Winstead— T. T. & Elmo Mitchell 

Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Brown's No. 1 & 2 — 0. P. Joyce, Roy Carter 
Farmers — F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorfield 
Piedmont — J. J. Webster, G. D. Rakestraw 
Slate No. 1 & 2— F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorfield 

Winston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Brown — R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson 

Carolina — H. M. Bouldin, G. H. Robertson 

Dixie— Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell, M. M. Joyner 

Farmers— Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell, M. M. Joyner 

Glenn Co.— C. T. Glenn, D. L. Harris, Chas. Dalton 

Liberty— M. M. Joyner, J. R. Pell, W. G. Sheets, Floyd Joyce 

Pepper No. 1 & 2— F. D. Pepper 

Piedmont — W. B. Simpson, R. W. Newsom 

Planters — Foss Smithdeal, Frank Smithdeal, Wes Watson 

Taylor— Paul Taylor, J. H. Dyer 

Big Winston— R. T. & J. F. Carter 

Cooks No. 1 & 2— B. E. Cook, C. B. Strickland, Wm. Fowler, H. A. 

Thomas 
George-Davis — Foss & Frank Smithdeal, Wes Watson 

29 



N. C. BURLEY BELT 

Asheville (two sets buyers — second set incomplete) 
Carolina — Max Roberts, Mgr. 
Dixie No. 1 & 2— J. C. Adams, L. J. Hill 
Planters No. 1 & 2— J. W. Stewart, Fred D. Cockfield 
Bernard-Walker Warehouses — James E. Walker, Mgr. 
Big Burley— J. C. Adams, L. J. Hill 
Day's — Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Burley No. 1 & 2 — R. C. Coleman 
Farmers Burley — R. C. Coleman 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley— C. C. Taylor 
Planters— C. C. Taylor 
Jarrell's— C. C. Taylor 



30 



CONSUMER- 
PURCHASES 
OF TOBACCO 



Total 




$ BIL. 



.>. * 



1940 



1945 1950 





1955 



• PRELIMINARY ESTIMATES 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEC. 1269-54(12) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE